Tag Archives: creativity

Galimoto, Makerspace and Third Grade

I was searching for an idea for a makerspace activity when I thought of Karen Lynn Williams’ book, Galimoto.  I also have a galimoto I purchased years ago and figured the children could create one using pipe cleaners (I know, they’re called chenille stems…but I can’t break the habit of 50 years of saying “pipe cleaners”).

I decided that third grade would probably be able to think three dimensionally and have the motor skill development to do this. And, they did (although some really struggled).

Read the Book

After reading the book to the class, I showed them my galimoto.  They were amazed and intrigued by this simple toy.img_4904.jpg

Design the Galimoto

I had the teacher group the students into pairs and each pair was given a sheet of paper and a pencil and instructed to decide what wheeled creation they were going to create.  They drew their design and that is all we accomplished in the first session.  Some used non-fiction books if they were stumped as to what their vehicle really looked like. They had to work well as a team to decide on what they were going to do and then how to draw it out.

The Construction

At the beginning of our second session, I handed each student a copy of the IB Transdisciplinary Skills-Social Skills.  They took turns reading aloud so that everyone was familiar with what good team work looks like. Each group was given ten pipe cleaners and some scissors along with their drawing.  I did make a couple of suggestions, for instance, to create shapes with the pipe cleaner and then cut off excess.  I reminded them that they only had ten pipe cleaners so to plan wisely.

Motor Skills and Hands-on Experience

Some students do not have highly developed fine motor skills (their thumbs are probably very developed!) and had a difficult time figuring out how to twist the pipe cleaners together or around.  Lack of experience mostly.  They were getting the hang of it by the end.  Many of our students don’t seem to have a wide range of experience of making things with their hands and also seem awkward using scissors.  All the more reason to provide more opportunities for makerspace type activities.

Many students created an outline of their design, ie. a two dimensional obect, and thought they were done!  With further support they figured out it had to be three dimensional, just like the galimoto I had.

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The Final Product

Pretty much each group completed their galimoto after about thirty minutes.  Success.  They were very proud of their accomplishment.

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Filed under Books, IB PYP, Makerspace Activity, Uncategorized

The Most Perfect Snowman

A last minute idea turned out great!  I needed a quick book and activity for third grade classes for our first week back to school after the winter break.  I perused through some new books and saw, The Most Perfect Snowman by Chris Britt.  This story is about sharing and being judged on your clothes; it’s a combination of fantasy and real emotions.  After reading this book, I asked the students to create their “perfect snowman.”

Creating Their Perfect Snowman

I asked them to think what their perfect snowman would look like.  Granted, our children don’t have much (in some cases, any) experience in building real snowmen, since it hardly ever snows in south Georgia.

I asked them to think of how their snowman would show emotion and motion.  How could they express themselves? What might they do?

They really enjoyed the freedom to be creative.  Some struggle when they have very few directions.  I did hear a few, “I may a mistake; I need a new paper.”  No, just turn it over or treat that “mistake” as an opportunity!

They loved this activity and it was so simple, construction paper and crayons.

I love their artwork, including traditional snowmen, a cowboy snowman, police snowman, teacher snowman, football player snowman and more.

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Second Grade, Fred McFee and Skeletons

I love the book, The Bones of Fred McFee by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Kurt Cyrus.  The rhyming text and luscious illustrations make it a delight to read.  I needed an activity for second grade and one of the Georgia Standards of Excellence they are exploring now is in physical science, S2P 1 b. Construct an explanation for how structures made from small pieces (linking cubes, building blocks) can be disassembled and then rearranged to make new and different structures.

I was thinking of having the students assemble something and it needed to be from supplies that I had a lot of.  Thought a bit and remembered the tub full of popsicle sticks!  The idea of assembling a skeleton just popped into my head and that made me think of Fred McFee.

We read the book and I showed them examples of non-fiction books that had information and illustrations of skeletons; a dictionary, an encyclopedia and a non-fiction book.  I placed these on the tables and the teacher paired up the students.  Each group had a dictionary with the skeleton illustration and a heap of popsicle sticks.

Initially some students asked how could they assemble a skeleton.  I referred them to the illustrations and asked how they might form a head or legs.  The soon got the hang of it.  One of the classes did this activity on a day that they were dressed as super heroes as part of Red Ribbon Week.  You’ll notice that some students posed their skeletons in super hero poses and then posed themselves for the photo!

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Filed under Books, Information Literacy Instruction, Makerspace Activity, Uncategorized