Tag Archives: Jon Klassen

First Grade-Jon Klassen Author Study

 

 

IMG_2713I did this series of lessons last year and the students and I enjoyed it so much that I decided to do it again!  I “borrowed” the idea from Jennifer Reed.  I read about it on her blog, Reedarama (https://goo.gl/HMzc4G).

I like to give students as many opportunities to write when they visit the library as possible.  With first graders just reinforcing the idea that “sentences start with a capital letter and end with a punctuation mark” is good practice.

This Is Not My Hat: Week One

I love this book and so do the students.  When I read the line, “I just stole it”  there are usually several children who just gasp. They are so innocent.  After reading the book I ask them how they think the big fish got his hat back, after all we don’t see the action amongst the plants.

I fold copy paper into thirds and have them write their response on the top one-third.  They use colored pencils, which they really like.  The directions are to first write your sentence and then illustrate it.  I find that some students need a lot of prompting to think creatively.  Perhaps that is because we don’t give them as many opportunities to think outside the box as we should.  There are no right answers here, just your own opinion.

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I Want My Hat Back: Week Two

We read this book and I ask them what they think happened to the rabbit. They write their response in the middle third and most write that they think the bear did eat the rabbit.

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Translation: The bear “snatched” it off.

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We Found a Hat: Week Three

After reading this title I ask the children how the turtles resolve the problem of having only one hat.  This really stumped a few students.  One girl (bless her heart) just kept repeating, “There are two turtles and they have one hat.”  After much discussion I desperately grabbed two pencils and said, “Let’s pretend there are two girls and they only have one bike (I used a book to represent the bike).  How will they solve this problem?”  Finally the light bulb went off and she said something like, “They take turns.”  Break through!  This just reinforces my idea that we don’t let students problem-solve like we should.

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1st Grade and Jon Klassen

Shout out to Jennifer Reed who inspired me to do this activity.  Check out her blog post on Reederama- “ReedALOUD: The Many Hats of Jon Klassen”( https://goo.gl/HMzc4G).  She worked with 2nd grade students, but I decided to do this with 1st grade.  Our school is emphasizing writing across all grade levels and I was pretty sure the 1st grade students could do this.img_0670

Session One-This Is Not My Hat

Jennifer used a trifolded piece of paper, which I also did.  I had pencils and crayons on the table.  After reading This Is Not My Hat, I asked the students what they thought happened in the place “where the plants are big and tall and close together.”  I instructed them to write a sentence to describe what happened and illustrate it.

Students reflecting on what they thought happened in the place where the plants grow close.

Students reflecting on what they thought happened in the place where the plants grow close.

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Session Two-I Want My Hat Back

I have about 30 minutes with each class when they visit.  This allows me about 15-20 minutes max to do instruction and activity, so I decided to do one Klassen book each week.  In the book, I Want My Hat Back, we see the bear seating on crumpled grass and saying “I would not eat a rabbit” although, I told the students, we don’t really know if he did eat the rabbit.  So I asked what they think happened to the rabbit.

Students writing and drawing how they think the bear got his hat back.

Students writing and drawing how they think the bear got his hat back from the rabbit.

The bear asked "nice lee."

The bear asked “nice lee.”

Session Three-We Found a Hat

For the last Klassen hat book, I asked the students what they thought happened the next day.  Lots of different explanations from the positive (they share the hat) to the not-so positive (they fight over the hat)!  Really the point of this 3 week activity was to practice writing sentances, ensuring that the sentances started with a capital letter and had some sort of puncuation at the end.

The turtles share (ser) the hat.

The turtles share (ser) the hat.

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The Klassen books were very popular and it was funny that they got the humor of them and usually laughed in the same places.

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UPDATE: Today after reading the book, Swap! by Steve Light to a first grade class and the students were getting up and going to check out books, one of the students asked, “Are we going to write today?”  I was stumped for a minute.  Write?  Then the light bulb went off.  For the past 3 weeks these students had been writing and drawing each time after reading a Jon Klassen book.  Ah, so maybe some of them were really enjoying that part of their library visit!

 

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